Choose your focus

14 Mar

Anything you pay attention to in your classroom will inevitably increase. It truly is as simple as that. The human perception focuses on things we expect. This is why verbalizing your positive expectations in the classroom will make a difference.

As a teacher you are externalizing your values and beliefs while you teach, i.e. communicate with your students.  So, if you expect students to hate learning…. well… that is what you will get.  And vice versa, if you expect every student being capable for learning and submitting good quality work, that is what you will get (sooner or later- be patient).

Focusing your communication on what you want to happen in your classroom creates the expectation for students. I am talking about the subtexts of the classrooms anywhere, on any level of education.  There are ancient and new studies about this issue, one of my favourites being the Pygmalion Effect, of course. And I know already visited this issue in the post about Hidden Expectations, but  I wanted to focus more on communication here, and emphasize its effects on learning. Or, not learning.

Every teacher knows how it is not only important what you say, but also how you say it and the non-verbal communication accompanying your message. These three are commonly referred to as verbal, paraverbal and non-verbal messages, and the emphasis of each of them changes a bit depending on the age of your students. The younger the student, the more emphasis you need to put on the para-and non-verbal messages. Often this is expressed with a triangle showing a small portion on the tip being the verbal communication, and the other two being the  over 90% majority of what children actually receive. For more mature students the verbal message is stronger, but the other two parts of your message still remain important.

But there is actually more to that. Your classroom practices must match with your communication. If your words (and expressions) are being positive but the undertone strongly negative, students will be following the latter. Having practices that promote initiative, autonomy and student accountability strengthen your positive messages in the classroom, and also strengthen students’ understanding about their own learning process – which of course makes giving positive feedback even easier.

Creating positive spirals in classroom is easy! It is also a choice each and every teacher has to make. It starts from stating positive expectations to your students, and then making sure your classroom practices match with your words.

What do you want your focus to be?

Advertisements

3 Responses to “Choose your focus”

  1. 3D Eye March 15, 2012 at 1:39 am #

    “Having practices that promote initiative, autonomy and student accountability strengthen your positive messages in the classroom, and also strengthen students’ understanding about their own learning process – which of course makes giving positive feedback even easier.”

    What a wonderful sentence. The best classrooms and schools are always places where you can see students using their initiative, making suggestions for their own learning pathways, and demonstrating their desire for self-directed learning. In good Primary schools we can see these things happening in the youngest classes, and all the way through to the oldest pupils. In other words – we don’t have to wait until pupils are fluent readers and writers, and we don’t have to wait until they reach secondary school, before they are capable of using their initiative and capable of being autonomous learners. In fact, it’s in secondary schools that we tend to see the most didactic teacher-centred and curriculum-centred education taking place, and the fewest numbers of students using initiative and demonstrating autonomous learning.

    It’s good to know that in Finland, at least, these ideas are set out in official government documents, under Aims of Education – “At all levels of education in Finland, trusting this willingness to learn and to take responsibility for one’s own learning is of the utmost importance.”

  2. Jyothi singh April 4, 2012 at 10:03 am #

    Thank you! Its so clear now.

  3. Ali Tahir November 10, 2012 at 9:14 am #

    Well defined and effective articles. Thank you!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: